Capitalist realism insists on treating mental health as if it were a natural fact, like weather (but, then again, weather is no longer a natural fact so much as a political-economic effect). In the 1960s and 1970s, radical theory and politics (Laing, Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, etc.) coalesced around extreme mental conditions such as schizophrenia, arguing, for instance, that madness was not a natural, but a political, category. But what is needed now is a politicization of much more common disorders. Indeed, it is their very commonness which is the issue: in Britain, depression is now the condition that is most treated by the NHS. In his book The Selfish Capitalist, Oliver James has convincingly posited a correlation between rising rates of mental distress and the neoliberal mode of capitalism practiced in countries like Britain, the USA and Australia. In line with James’s claims, I want to argue that it is necessary to reframe the growing problem of stress (and distress) in capitalist societies. Instead of treating it as incumbent on individuals to resolve their own psychological distress, instead, that is, of accepting the vast privatization of stress that has taken place over the last thirty years, we need to ask: how has it become acceptable that so many people, and especially so many young people, are ill?

Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative? (via funeral)

(Source: toxicwinner)

Musée D’Orsay, Paris.

(Source: tierradentro)

vacilandoelmundo:

Time Slice by Richard Silver

The idea behind the “Time Sliced” Project was to photograph iconic world buildings at sunset and capture the changing light from day to night in a single image. Experimenting with a few different kinds of processes I came up with the “Sliced” idea. I decided to Slice time and light showing the progression of the day from left to right.

awkwardsituationist:

fog over (click pic) dubai (photographed by bjoern lauen and chloratine), shanghai (wei gensheng), chicago (steve raymer and bob gaudet), london (mpsinthesky), vancouver (andy clark), and new york (girish tewani)

(Source: pinterest.com)

moarrrmagazine:

What’s in store for me in the direction I don’t take? 
- Adam Lupton

fuckyesbenwhishaw:

"...He was only 23 when he gave us a dark prince [Hamlet] who dazzled. And he didn’t stop dazzling. He’s now 33 and seems both younger — waifish and playful — and older. He talks with wisdom and with the rhythm of an old poet..." >